Tag Archives: Trend Micro

Supply chain risk to dominate 2020: from the cloud all the way to the remote worker

by Bharat Mistry

We all know that the success or otherwise of most modern organisations depends to a large degree on their supply chains. From professional services partners to software providers and transportation contractors, an average enterprise could maintain hundreds of these partnerships. But these all threaten to introduce extra risk to the business, especially in the cyber domain.

Trend Micro’s newly released 2020 predictions report highlights some of the key areas where organisations may be exposed next year: from cloud and managed service providers (MSPs), new DevOps dependencies and even supply chain risks associated with their remote workers.

A new spin on an old risk
Supply chain risk is not a new phenomenon per se. The infamous NotPetya ransomware attacks of 2017 were introduced via the software supply chain, for example, while Operation Cloud Hopper was a major attack campaign targeting global organisations via their MSPs.

However, the scale of the threat coming down the line requires urgent attention. It stems to a large degree from the way organisations are changing the way they work. Digital transformation is viewed by many as an essential driver of business growth, enabling firms to respond with agility to changing market demands. In practice, this means cloud and DevOps increasingly taking centre stage in the IT departments of the coming decade.

More agility, more risk?
Unfortunately, this will introduce new cyber risk. First, organisations’ increasing reliance on third-party cloud providers will encourage attackers to go after data stored in these accounts, via code injection attacks exploiting deserialisation bugs, cross-site scripting and SQL injection. They’ll also capitalise on mistakes made when misconfiguration of these accounts leaks data to the public-facing internet.

Next, they’ll look to exploit the reliance of DevOps teams on third-party code in container components and libraries to compromise microservices and serverless environments. As these architectures become increasingly commonplace, so will attacks.

The risk posed by MSPs will also escalate, enabling a much higher ROI for attackers because they can access multiple customers via a single provider. Such threats will imperil corporate and customer data, and even pose a risk to smart factory and other environments.

Finally, supply chain risk may come from an unlikely source in 2020 and beyond. As remote and home working becomes the norm for many employees, hackers may come to view these as a handy stepping-stone into corporate networks. Whether they’re logging-on via unsecured public Wi-Fi hotspots or at home, where smart home flaws could provide an unlocked door to sneak through, these employees need to be considered as part of holistic enterprise risk management strategies.

What to do
I
t will be tough for CISOs to keep up with the rapid pace of technological change as we head through the next decade. But it’s vital that teams are equipped with the right tools and strategies to manage these third-party risks and other threats to the bottom line and corporate reputation. Here’s a snapshot of advice offered in the report:

  • Improve due diligence of cloud providers and MSPs
  • Conduct regular vulnerability and risk assessments on third parties
  • Invest in security tools to scan for vulnerabilities and malware in third-party components
  • Consider Cloud Security Posture Management (CSPM) tools to help minimise the risk of misconfigurations
  • Revisit security policies regarding home and remote workers

To find out more on our predictions for 2020 and advice on how best to manage risk in your business, check out the report here.

Industry 4.0: protecting the smart factory from escalating cyber-threats

by Ian Heritage

As in many other sectors, manufacturing organisations are rapidly embracing digital transformation to drive efficiencies, agility and growth. In so doing, they’re investing in new industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) systems to accelerate convergence between previously siloed IT and OT spheres. But this digital revolution also opens the door to new threats, as previously air-gapped systems and proprietary technologies are brought online and exposed to remote hackers.

That’s why Trend Micro has just announced major new security products designed to enhance visibility and protection for imperilled industrial control system (ICS) environments.

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Tackling CSAM One Wi-Fi Hotspot at a Time

by Bharat Mistry

At Trend Micro our work to combat online threats and make the digital world a safer place stretches far beyond the obvious: malware and cyber-attacks on customers. In fact, since 2008 our Internet Safety for Kids and Families (ISKF) programme has been a leading light in the industry, spearheading Trend Micro’s efforts to be a more responsible corporate citizen. One of its core goals is to help combat the spread of child sex abuse material (CSAM) online.

We’re delighted to be driving these ambitious aims forward, most recently with newly minted recognition as a “Friendly WiFi Approved Provider” in the UK.

Family friendly Wi-Fi

Public Wi-Fi is rightly regarded with some suspicion by cybersecurity experts, who point out that it could enable attackers to eavesdrop on private conversations and even steal important log-ins. However, there’s another risk: that the internet service behind it could allow individuals, especially young people, to view inappropriate and even CSAM material.

First trailed by the Prime Minister in 2013 and launched the following year, the Friendly WiFi scheme is industry’s response. By applying to be certified under the scheme, public and guest Wi-Fi providers can show they’re putting their customers first. How? By offering global public assurance that the wireless networks consumers use when out and about is independently certified as filtered from pornography and CSAM.

Although Trend Micro doesn’t run its own public/guest Wi-Fi networks across the UK, we wanted to get involved and show our support for the initiative and the wider aims of online safety that ISKF has been driving for over a decade. That’s why we’re delighted to now be certified as an Approved Provider.

ISKF and the next decade

This latest recognition can be seen as part of our three-pronged approach to tackling CSAM. This is built around the following tenets:

Educate: raising awareness among young people about the risks involved in sharing images or trusting people online.

Integrate into products/services: blocking known CSAM using watchlists such as those run by the UK’s Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) and building it into our products, ie via web reputation. We’ll also alert industry hotlines if our products and services come across such content.

Collaborate: We’re already serving on the advisory board of the INHOPE Foundation, a global association of internet hotlines.And we’re always on the lookout for new ways to team up with like-minded organisations across the world.

Friendly WiFi is just the latest in a long line of initiatives by ISKF to extend our goal of creating a world safe for the exchange of digital information to the world’s youngest citizens. We educate, we collaborate, we innovate and we practice what we preach all around the world in order to help realise this vision.

Trend Micro’s bottom-line message to kids and families is that, if you’re online: be safe, be savvy and be kind. It might not always be easy, but there’s plenty of support and advice on our website to help those who need it.

Open Source Software Risk Highlights the Need for Secure DevOps

by Bharat Mistry

UK firms on average download 21,000 open source software components containing flaws each year. That is the headline stat from new research which reveals the escalating risks facing developers from the common practice of sharing code. As demand for such components increases, the emphasis for security teams should be on finding ways to mitigate these risks as early on in the development lifecycle as possible, via seamless, automated security that doesn’t impact app delivery.

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