Tag Archives: Trend Micro Deep Security

As Server 2008 is retired, there’s an obvious alternative to Microsoft extended support

By Ross Baker

On the 14th of January 2020, Microsoft will be retiring its popular Windows Server 2008 and Server 2008 R2 products. This leaves businesses with a difficult choice: stick with the OS and pay for expensive extended support, spend time and resources on migration, or leave the company exposed to cyber-threats.

The good news is that there’s a better, lower cost option that will enable you to keep running Server 2008 whilst mitigating cyber risk and avoiding major disruption – invest in comprehensive server security.

Wait-and-see won’t do
Speaking to numerous businesses over recent weeks, a worryingly high number are prepared to adopt a wait-and-see policy (WASP) following the end of Server 2008 support on 14 January 2020. This amounts to an extreme hedging of bets and something we would definitely not recommend.  

Without Microsoft support, customers will no longer have access to security updates for Windows 2008. Unsupported servers will become be exposed to attacks exploiting vulnerabilities found after January 2020. This is more likely than you think: the black hats know there will be many organisations that may be running exposed servers and will be putting more resources into finding these bugs.  

To make matters worse, Microsoft will continue to release fixes for vulnerabilities in current versions of its server OS products which may also affect Server 2008. That’s an open goal for a hacker.

What are the alternatives?
One way out of this bind is to pay for Microsoft extended support, which will deliver security updates beyond the retirement deadline. But be warned, this is not cheap. An analysis of Microsoft’s End of Service FAQs from CRN reveals:
• The cost of Extended Security Updates will be 75% of the Enterprise Agreement or Server & Cloud Enrolment license prices of the latest version of SQL Server/Windows Server
• Firms will be covered for three consecutive 12-month increments following end-of-support, but must pay up-front for the first year
• Organisations that sign-up in the middle of a year must pay for the full year
• Companies that decide not to sign-up for a year and then do so the following year must pay for both years

Why go through all this when there’s an easier and more cost-effective alternative? 

Trend Micro Deep Security features a next-generation intrusion prevention system known as “virtual patching” to protect servers and endpoints from threats that target vulnerabilities in critical applications. It will keep your Windows Server 2008 systems safe even from zero-day threats that Microsoft hasn’t yet encountered.  Virtual Patching will also:

Buy additional time: for security teams to assess vulnerabilities and test and apply the necessary patches. 

Avoid unnecessary downtime: by allowing enterprises to patch according to their own schedule. This mitigates the potential revenue loss caused by unplanned disruptions.

Improve regulatory compliance: such as Cyber Essentials and the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI-DSS).

Provide flexibility: by reducing the need to roll-out workarounds or emergency patches. 

Given the current threat landscape, WASP is simply not a risk worth taking for your organisation. Whether you need to stick on Windows Server 2008 for financial reasons or because of legacy application support, look to third-party virtual patching to minimise cyber risk and support your business beyond January 2020.

Find out more and how much you could save by visiting https://resources.trendmicro.com/uk-windows-server-end-of-support.html and try out our Windows 2008 End-of-Support Cost Savings Calculator.

Tackling risk in a multi- and hybrid cloud world

by Bharat Mistry

Cloud computing sits front-and-centre of most organisations’ growth plans today. The sheer scalability and cost efficiencies that can be wrung out of on-demand compute services helpfirms to do more with less, respond with greater agility to meet market demands, support seamless DevOps processes, and run a leaner, greener business. It’s no surprise that the public IaaS market grew over 31% in 2018 to top $32 billion.

Yet cybersecurity is a perennial barrier to cloud success, and it’s getting harder as cloud deployments grow in scale and complexity. Put simply, organisations can no longer handle their cloud security needs with a collection of point products. They need a simple, unified platform for maximum visibility and control.

Fragmented and risky
The macro trend points to increased cloud adoption as digital transformation efforts taking hold across a range of verticals. But peer closer and the picture is much more nuanced. In reality, there are many different flavours of cloud adoption. No two organisations are alike and running the same kind of IT infrastructure. Legacy servers may sit alongside virtualised infrastructure and/or public cloud deployments. Then there are fast-emerging services like containers and serverless. Some organisations may be investing in multiple platforms from different providers, ramping the complexity up even further.

In dynamic hybrid and multi-cloud environments like these, CISOs need to ensure that workloads are protected wherever they are. At the same time, hackers are increasingly focusing their efforts on exploiting vulnerabilities in containers and the third-party code that is shared and reused in the developer community to accelerate DevOps. Then there’s the challengeof human error, with misconfiguration of cloud architecture a major risk.

The impact of security breaches could be catastrophic, leading to data theft, ransomware, and other cyber-threats that could undermine brand value and damage the bottom line.

Trend Micro unifies cloud security
Up until now, organisations have had no choice but to keep running multiple point products to secure various parts of their hybrid cloud infrastructure. But it doesn’t have to be this complicated. 

Cloud One from Trend Micro brings together the world’s leading workload security service and container image scanning/runtime protection with brand-new offerings for application security, network security, file storage security and cloud security posture management (CSPM). The latter comes from Trend Micro’s recent acquisition of Cloud Conformity – delivering a product designed to mitigate misconfiguration mistakes and enhance security compliance and governance in the cloud.

Whatever stage your cloud journey is at, you’ll get simplified, automated protection delivered from a single console, with single-sign on, common user and cloud-service enrolment, and a common pricing and billing model.

Available from Q1 2020, Cloud One will cover:• Trend Micro™ Cloud One – Workload Security• Cloud One – Container Image Security• Cloud One – File Storage Security• Cloud One – Network Security• Cloud One – Cloud Posture Management• Cloud One – Application Security

To find out more, please visit https://www.trendmicro.com/en_us/business/campaigns/cloud-one-services.html

VMworld Europe: Time to Simplify Cloud Complexity Through Unified Security

by Simon Young

Cloud is at the heart of any organisation’s digital transformation efforts today, with new DevOps practices driving innovation. But although these efforts promise faster time-to-market and greater agility, the truth is that with greater adoption comes potentially greater complexity and the danger of cloud siloes. According to the latest IDC stats out this week, 90% of organisations will look to migrate to hybrid and multi-cloud environments over the next six years. In this fracturing world, it’s important to ensure you have unified security which works across all major platforms.

That’s part of the message Trend Micro will be bringing to VMworld Europe next week. Continue reading

Mitigating the Threat of the World’s Top Hacking Tools

By Bharat Mistry

When it comes to cybersecurity, information is power. So we were pleased recently to see GCHQ’s  National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) release a new document highlighting the five most common publicly available hacking tools. Although far from exhaustive, it will provide some much-needed guidance for security teams on what to look out for and how to maximise detection and protection.

Those operating VMware environments and looking to follow this best practice advice would do well to consider our flagship Deep Security offering. As we’ll be discussing at VMworld Europe next month, the combination of tight integration and full-featured security is a winner for protecting software-defined datacentres and hybrid cloud environments.

The top hacking tools
Perhaps the most telling thing about the NCSC report is that it had to be produced at all. It’s very much a sign of the times: a reminder of how the cybercrime underground has democratised hacking tools for widespread use. According to the report, produced in concert with cybersecurity specialists from all Five Eyes nations, initial compromise is usually achieved via exploitation of software vulnerabilities or poorly configured systems. After that, hackers may use:

Remote Access Trojans (RATs): like JBiFrost which could be used to install backdoors and key loggers, take screen shots, and exfiltrate data.

Web shells: like China Copper — malicious scripts which offer remote administrative capabilities.

Credential stealers: like Mimikatz which steal user log-ins so an actor can move internally through a target network.

Lateral movement frameworks: like PowerShell Empire which allow attackers to move around once inside a network.

C2 obfuscation tools: like HTran which help to disguise the bad guys’ location when compromising a victim.

There’s a long list of recommendations from NCSC for firms looking to better detect and protect themselves from such threats. But among the key pieces of advice are:

Keep systems patched and up-to-date
Use “modern systems and software”
Employ network monitoring and firewalls
Implement network segmentation
Deploy host-based intrusion detection
Whitelist applications
Use AV from a reputable provider

Partnering on security

These recommendations play very much to Trend Micro’s strengths as a security pioneer and a decade-long partner of VMware’s with our flagship datacentre product Deep Security. We offer:

Anti-malware, firewall, log inspection, web reputation, integrity monitoring, and IDS/IPS and Application Control
Comprehensive security controls automatically deployed as each new VM is spun up
Virtual patching to keep apps/servers shielded from emerging threats until a patch becomes available
Support for NSX for hypervisor-based security, enabling micro-segmentation

All of this comes with an architecture designed to optimise performance in virtual environments, and offer enhanced visibility across physical, virtual and hybrid cloud IT from a single console. Trend Micro on VMware realises the NCSC’s vision of “modern” systems and software designed with security in mind.

We’ll be taking this message to VMworld next month, with two speaking slots slated:

Enabling Hybrid Cloud Security for NSX and VMWare Cloud on AWS [SAI1032BES]
Bryan Webster, Principal Architect, Trend Micro
Jeremiah Cornelius, Security Envisioning Architect – Partner Products – VMware Global Technology Alliance, VMware
Wednesday, Nov 07, 3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Mind the Gap: Building a closer relationship between Security and DevOps [DEV1031BES]
Bryan Webster, Principal Architect, Trend Micro
Doug Cahill, Group Director and Senior Analyst , Enterprise Strategy Group
Wednesday, Nov 07, 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

We look forward to seeing you at the show.

What: VMworld Europe
Where: Barcelona
When: 5-8 November